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1. NETL-Developed Carbon Capture Technology Wins 2012 R&D 100 Award

A novel carbon capture technology developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory has been recognized by R&D Magazine as among the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the commercial marketplace within the past year. This year’s award recognizes NETL’s patented and patent-pending technologies that capture CO2 from flue gas streams.

Sorbent pellets of immobilized polyethylenimine on the support CARiACT Q10, a commercial silica gel support with a diameter of 100 to 350 μm. Sorbent pellets were prepared in two 600-lb batches by Pressure Chemical Company.

Sorbent pellets of immobilized polyethylenimine on the support CARiACT Q10, a commercial silica gel support with a diameter of 100 to 350 μm. Sorbent pellets were prepared in two 600-lb batches by Pressure Chemical Company.

CO2 is one of the major greenhouse gases impacting climate change, and nearly one-third of man-made CO2 emissions result from the combustion of fossil fuels for electricity generation. NETL has been investigating ways to control CO2 emissions from power plants using the two-step carbon sequestration process (carbon capture followed by permanent storage). NETL’s “Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process for CO2 Capture” is one result of this effort. This process advances the capture of CO2 from power plants, preventing its release into the air. The captured CO2 can then be permanently stored in a carbon sequestration scenario.

The process encompasses a portfolio of techniques for producing regenerable immobilized amine-based sorbents and provides a method for capturing CO2 from flue gas streams. Low-cost, regenerable amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technologies including increased CO2 capture capacity, reduced corrosion, lower energy requirements and costs, and minimized water usage. Additionally, amine-based sorbents are scalable for use in industrial applications, including coal combustion and gasification-based power generating systems.

This technology can be used to reduce cost and energy associated with more conventional scrubbing processes, both as a retrofit to older power plants that currently burn coal or applied to new, more efficient pulverized coal-fired power plants. Additionally, the BIAS process can capture CO2 from utilities that combust oil or natural gas. Although the process is envisioned for use primarily as a postcombustion CO2 capture method for power generation point sources, BIAS sorbents are also being considered for other applications, such as natural gas cleanup, life support systems/confined spaces, and air capture systems.

R&D 100 Awards identify state-of-the art technologies and help move innovative science into the public marketplace. Congratulations to McMahan Gray, Henry Pennline, Daniel Fauth, James Hoffman, and Kevin Resnik of the BIAS team for this prestigious recognition.